Founded in 1941, The Thoreau SocietyTM is the oldest and largest organization devoted to an American author.

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"I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil—to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society." "Walking," Thoreau

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Read "The Thoreau Society Bulletin," Summer Issue


Henry D. Thoreau

The struggle for social and environmental justice

Henry David Thoreau saw the exploitation of people and of nature as two sides of the same coin of injustice and oppression. In his own day, he decried an economic and political system that countenanced human bondage even as it despoiled nature. As he asks in “Slavery in Massachusetts,” “[W]hat signifies the beauty of nature when men are base?”

The Thoreau Society continues our namesake’s struggle to open all eyes to social and environmental injustice, and to end blindness to the consequences of unchecked racism, climate change, and other threats to individual freedom, democratic equality, and social justice in the United States and around the world. As a community devoted to Thoreau’s legacy, we are a work-in-progress, committed to the perpetual challenge of improving the Thoreau Society as an embodiment—and a promoter—of these ideals.

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The Thoreau Society Bulletin

This issue of the "Thoreau Society Bulletin" is made possible by a grant from Mass Humanities, which provided funding through the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as part of the federal CARESS Act legislation. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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“'There Is More Day to Dawn': A Global Conversation Celebrating Teaching and Diversity"

October 31 & November 1, 2020

Brought to you by The Thoreau Society; sponsored by Thoreau Farm Trust